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20121104
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the existing law and involved in the in that examinations of the impediments to affect the resolution and we are working on a cooperative basis to overcome those. so in conclusion, dodd-frank is certainly given the significant new responsibilities to address these risks associated in the recent financial crisis. you take these responsibilities seriously and we are ready to use these authorities when they are needed. hopefully not. but while the key provisions are now in place, we are continuing to implement the remaining provisions in rulemaking and we continue to refine our thinking on the process we increase transparency in the rest of the market's on these powerful new tools and how they can best be used to maintain financial stability and end to big to fail. i look forward to participating in the q&a. thank you very much. [applause] >> now for the downside. first i want to thank you professor bachmann for organizing this. it's an excellent panel i must say and i've always enjoyed being on the panel with space and rick. laughter come i want to take on everything that was said, so let me g
designed to collect possible automation in a way that can scrub the laws. so you have these distinctions between methods and the missions of wikileaks versus traditional press such that if the government decides to bring a case in wikileaks i have some confidence that the rest of the press will not be chilled. but, obviously that is a tough line to draw. and it is getting tougher and tougher with more immediate, more news being disseminated by sort of these alternative routes , bloggers and the like. >> so let's do one more question here and then we will take some from the audience and a couple of minutes. so picking up, again, on the judge's comments about -- about some extent of over classification or misclassification and also on cans discussion of the hard issues that are posed by the legitimate was a blow or, the person who legitimately is motivated to disclose some kind of wrongdoing. i once asked about something that we hear a lot in cases about discovery in civil lawsuits. not so much. the idea that, perhaps, something is government conduct is arguably unlawful in some respects,
training from here in the united states. i lead a rule law forum back to the states last january. all aimed at assisting the judicial system. as the saudi system has moved out on a number of areas, we have supported their efforts. in yemen, saudi arabia played a significant role in brokering a gcc led political transition agreement. and continue to provide a leadership role in the friends of yemen and support of the government. there have been the last few years a trend toward multilateralism. i say that with some reservation because certainly the gcc and the arab league have been active in the last two years in ways not previously seen. most recently, saudi arabia has pushed the idea of a gcc union patterned after the eu. for secretary clinton's national security operation form. last month in new york, it provides a venue for collaborative securities discussions with all of the gcc nations. but something has changed. it was reflected in the recent summit last august. i spoke with many of and some of them spoke with a different idea in the atmosphere of the meetings. one individual in parti
-span2. now more from the fordham law school conference. next, we hear from former cia acting general counsel john rizzo, and former justice department inspector general lyn fine. posted by the center on national security, this is an hour 20 minutes. >> okay, marty has charged us with finding all the solutions, and luckily i'm only the moderator so i would have to charge the three of you with giving us some solutions. i think the way this panel is organized is to provide context for what you just heard. i hadn't quite realized it would work as a will that we have the right people to give the right context, both in terms of the law, in terms of the post-9/11 decade and where it's taken us, in terms of the self-regulating institutional function of government, to figure out its own problems, make its own recommendations and maybe suggest its own solutions. and in terms of what all this means from the point of view of working in the field, on the ground, inside a covert realm. so we're going to try to tie this all together today by looking at some of these issues. and i have to trust that
, and we need to think about the risks they may post to other people. and lastly under current law before turn to part about health reform, i just would be remiss if i didn't point out in terms of access that there are some eligibility gaps in the snap. now be for some legal immigrants and unemployed childless adults who face a three-month time in a three month time limit has been suspended in most parts of the country during the recession. but basically if you don't have shown and you're between 18-29 you can only get food stamps, snap for three months. over a three-year period. if you're not working. and so that time limit will be coming back in the coming years and is really a serious weakness in the program. and we can talk, if people want to comment about what some of the other changes that are legislative the under consideration in coming, in congress right now. if folks want to go there but i'm going to skip that. most of what i want to talk about, looking forward to the next few years, what is the future of the snap access, and we were think as i said, about packaging step with ot
that is an important thing to remember. i have a budget of law at -- a little more than $1 million, which is a lot three-person like me. a cultural institution for an impact with the entire city -- that is not a -- not that much. museums are run on a higher budget. university colleges, professors in universities are on a bigger budget. the point is that if we want to solve this and realize we want to have more coverage, there are ways to do that. we have setup a society that knows how to find institutions with that kind of impact. the "texas tribune," we inspired them -- now they inspire us with their ideas and structure. >> they are treated from people from a "texas monthly magazine" wanted to focus on local politics? >> we were featured on the front page of the "new york times" after investigations we did. they told us, what can we do here? they decided they wanted to do an entity in austen that covers politics relevant to the entire state. now they're running on a $5 million budget. we are all talking at that. that is a lot of money for the -- not a lot of money for the type of impact that inst
to do what? last i checked, administer laws passed by congress. i think there's an open question whether they are doing that consistently across the board whether it's an energy space, environmental space, ect.. it's our job as attorneys general to participate in that transaction is preserved. that's why we filed a lawsuit. we'll see where it heads. it's less about the tax breaks for those corporations. it's more about what responsibility and opportunity has been vested in the state by the affordable care act in preserving that as a stake holder. >> i'm lee parsely with outside lawyer protection for lawsuit reform. in texas, there's a number of statutes that allow attorney general to have multiple violations. for a company that has inadvertently vollied the statute multiple times, those penalties can be substantial. at least philosophically, we've become concerned with that. do y'all have similar statutes in your state? is that an issue that we ought to have on the radar for those of us who are supporting the business community and their concerns about litigation? >> i can take that. tha
democrat voted against and did not become law and the government did not shut down. >> moderator: gentlemen let me jump ahead to a topic i was thinking about taking up a little later but since it's on the table congressman's dold your opponent says that on the 20 most important votes he did not break with your leaders even want once and not let the tea party to pull congress to the friends. what is your response to that? dold: my response is that was 24 votes if "the washington post" is correct. 24 this was passed with the majority and 10 of those votes danny hoyer voted with but do you know what's interesting about those votes? not a single vote talks about health care or the environment and not a single vote talks about transportation infrastructure. not a single one of those votes were dealing with education or a single one on gun control. all things that i think are important to people in the tenth district and i think are critical votes get my opponent doesn't want to talk about it. schneider: if you look at the
-thinking immigration policy. >> around the world waiting to come to this country and willing to respect our laws. i support legal immigration. i think we need changes to our immigration laws so that immigration is based more on talent and hard work and ability and skill so we have a pro-america immigration policy. with respect to children who are brocket here by their parents at the young age, i think we need a solution to the problem. congressman asked me last week if i had been in the house would i have voted. yes is the answer. the bill never made it through the senate. we need bipartisanship approaches i look forwarding with working with marco ruin ya to make sure a loss passes not that a single faction can pass something to the house. that's the difference between the house and the senate. the priority when i was there to secure the border. that's opened up opportunities to reform our immigration system. heinrich: wush of one of the thing things things is border patrol agencies to the board and hundreds of new custom about. that doesn't fix the underlying issue. we have proactive community. th
't the states for the states run goods and services. regulatory laws governing the market shall be constrained by applicable sections of the constitution as amended. congress has six years from the date of ramification to adjust the current law and eliminate federal organizations and payment to the steve organizations to support or provide marketable goods and services. >> moderator: thank you. mr. macgovern? macgovern: i wouldn't support the bailout of government failed businesses. i believe and as i've said many times, free-market and free - a credit more wealth, more prosperity for more people than any other system coming and you have to be free to succeed, but you also have to be free to fail. orderly bankruptcy would have occurred part another company never took a nickel and survived and that is the way that i would have proceeded on that point. the government doesn't have any money. we are sending our children and grandchildren is money, so let the free market work. >> moderator: mr. moss? moss: the free market did really well. after the second world war when the united states was a grow
, which is pursuing a nuclear weapons program contrary to international norms and laws. so when the u.s. is negotiating with iran, i think we should keep that in mind. and i don't think the united states officially wants to implode the iranian government or have the iranian government collapse or have the iranian government capitulate. i think our goals are pretty well defined. we want iran to stop enriching uranium to a higher degree that can be used for a nuclear weapon, period. and i think that's very achievable. part of the problem is iran's supreme leader, ayatollah khamenei, like ken said, is inflexible. he's even more inflexible than khomeini was, and there are indications that his advisers including within the revolutionary guards are not happy with him. he's been criticized even publicly for his decisions and style of rule. and when we look at the islamic republic, this is not a system that's different than the other authoritarian regimes that have been overthrown in the middle east. it is corrupt, it denies its people basic rights, social, political and economic, it discrimi
approach than some of those around him like his late brother in law or his brother, but it really doesn't matter. it's in material. we see the situation. we know what it is. and it's going to continue. i think increasingly there's a consensus at what the situation is in syria and what some of the pitfalls are. you know, i think there's much more realism now than there was a year ago. about what's going on in that country. and much more sober assessment on the part of u.s. officials and others as to what can and can't be done. certainly, being a former diplomat, you would not be surprised to find out that a belief that this, we should be leaning a diplomatic effort. but i'm not a fan of those who want to blame america for the situation, or blame american action up to now for the terrible deterioration that has taken place. remember jeane kirkpatrick at a republican convention, i think we nominating ronald reagan, excoriating the democrats are also the blaming america first. i would say to our arab friends, you have to be careful, too, because first we were to present in the middle east,
of the audience, a committee of byu faculty members as well as the byu law school reviewed the questions. they selected those addressing important utah national issues. some questions were edited for clarity. mr. howell will have the first question of the debate, for subsequent questions we'll alternate which candidate answers first. each candidate will then have a minute to answer the question, and both will have an additional 30 seconds for rebuttal. if i determine that a follow-up question is appropriate, each will have 30 seconds to respond to my follow-up yes. the first question is from joseph haywood, a student here at brigham young university. joseph? >> regarding health care, what responsibilities, if any, do you believe rest with state and local governments, and what responsibilities, if any, lay with the federal government? howell: thank you, joseph. you know, health care is a fifth of our gdp right now. i serve on the board of directors for sutter health, the largest not-for-profit health care organization in california. we've known for a long time that we have to have afforda
of society along with rule of law, along with a stable economy, along with writing business. >> i have an answer that is probably quite controversial and it doesn't have to do with the military%, but it has to do with the policy on how the u.s. controls the development of medical devices and drugs. it has become so problematic that a fireman and medical technology developers are now going to other countries to do the clinical trials in the work necessary to prove that their devices work successfully in human. this is a very backwards way of promoting national security in the context of preventing people from disease and injury through advanced technology. budget is important i think that if our industry and the health sector is turning to other countries that we maintain strong relationships with those countries and make sure there's a handshake there between our medical professionals and their medical professionals, that were not just experimenting on their populations. i think that is an important unintended consequence of our current policy. >> if i could pile on to your question. i
somethinge on the order of 95% primarily because of moore's law. companies are making the software so much easier to use. we are training people how to use these tools in two or threeg class sessions. now, they're not world class mill rights at the end of two oe three sessions, but if you're patrick buckley and you want to do an ipad case and you come in and take three classes, 90 days later you could have, just like he did, a million dollar company. they did $10 million this year. square did the original threeuae prototypes at tech shop on the benches, so they're doing just fine. so the chasm has just gotten much smaller. typically when you do a software start-up, now you need 25, 50, $75,000. well, now you can do a hardware start-up for the same kind ofsa money.me. we've had dozens and dozens andd dozens of crowd-funded projects come through from $10,000 to $100,000 that actually got them all the way through the prototyping stage, their first run in manufacturing. thatne is new to the world.ee you've never been able to do that for those kind of pricepoi points. >> danae, all kinds of ama
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15